Home / Africa / Europe heatwave: French city of Bordeaux hits record temperature

Europe heatwave: French city of Bordeaux hits record temperature

Children cool off at the Water Mirror on the Place de la Bourse as summer temperatures reach 42 degrees Celsius in the south-western French city of Bordeaux

Image copyright
AFP

Image caption

Children cooled off at the Water Mirror on the Place de la Bourse in Bordeaux

The French city of Bordeaux has hit its highest temperature since records began, according to the country’s national forecaster.

On Tuesday, Meteo France registered 41.2C (106.1F) in the south-western city, breaking a 2003 record of 40.7C.

Forecasters predict a record-breaking run across Europe this week in the continent’s second summer heatwave.

A World Meteorological Organization spokesperson said the heatwaves bore “the hallmark of climate change”.

“As we saw in June they are becoming more frequent, they’re starting earlier and they’re becoming more intense,” Claire Nullis added. “It’s not a problem that’s going to go away.”

How hot could it get?

Much of France has been issued with an orange alert – the second highest level of warning.

Meteo France said Paris temperatures might hit new highs on Thursday. The record, set in 1947, stands at 40.4C.

Comparisons have been drawn to a heat wave France experienced in August 2003, during which heat contributed to almost 15,000 deaths.

The mercury is also expected to climb to 40C in a string of countries:

  • In an unprecedented move, Belgium has issued a code red weather warning for the whole country
  • Spain declared a red alert in its Zaragoza region, which was hit by devastating wildfires last month. The European Commission’s Copernicus Climate Change Service says the risk of wildfires is high in Spain and in Portugal
  • In the Netherlands, the government activated its “national heat plan”

How high have temperatures been already?

The French weather service has reported temperatures of 42C in areas of the south-west. It is expected the heat will not dip below 20C for the rest of the week.

To limit the heating of water used to keep its nuclear reactors cool, French energy firm EDF said it would be shutting two reactors at the Golftech nuclear power plant in the southern Tarn-et-Garonne region.

Media captionBBC colleagues from hot countries give their tips for staying cool

An intense heatwave swept through areas of Europe last month, making it the hottest June on record.

France set an all-time high-temperature record, and new June highs were set in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Austria, Andorra, Luxembourg, Poland, and Germany.

Is climate change to blame?

Linking a single event to global warming is complicated. While extreme weather events like heatwaves occur naturally, experts say these will happen more often because of climate change.

Records going back to the late 19th Century show that the average temperature of the Earth’s surface has increased by about one degree since industrialisation.

A climatology institute in Potsdam, Germany, says Europe’s five hottest summers since 1500 have all been in the 21st Century.

Scientists are concerned that rapid warming linked to use of fossil fuels has serious implications for the stability of the planet’s climate.

Europe heatwave: French city of Bordeaux hits record temperature

Check Also

Six Bulgarians arrested over football racist abuse

England players leave the pitch during one of the stoppages in Monday’s qualifier Bulgarian police …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *