Home / FOOTBALL / Rules Changes in College Football: Targeting, Overtime and Blindside Blocks – The New York Times

Rules Changes in College Football: Targeting, Overtime and Blindside Blocks – The New York Times

Crucially, a “targeting indicator” will still need to be plainly evident for any call to be confirmed. The rule book offers some examples:

Launch — a player leaving his feet to attack an opponent by an upward and forward thrust of the body to make forcible contact in the head or neck area

A crouch followed by an upward and forward thrust to attack with forcible contact at the head or neck area, even though one or both feet are still on the ground

Leading with helmet, shoulder, forearm, fist, hand or elbow to attack with forcible contact at the head or neck area

Lowering the head before attacking by initiating forcible contact with the crown of the helmet.

“We had too many marginal calls, too many ticky-tack fouls, too many on the margin, just on the edge that, boy, they could have passed on that,” said Bill Carollo, the Big Ten’s coordinator of football officials. “Well, we’re going to get rid of that. Now it’s going to be tougher for my officials, especially in replay. Either it is or it isn’t, and I think that’s important.”

Carollo estimated that the rule change could result in a 10 percent reduction in targeting calls.

Players who are called for targeting still face ejection and, if the foul happens in the second half of a game, disqualification for the first half of the next game. But the N.C.A.A. has added a new punishment for repeat offenders.

If a player is penalized for targeting three times in the same season, he will be both ejected from the current game and suspended for the entire next game. The punishment will be repeated for every subsequent targeting penalty in a season.

For most games that reach overtime, nothing will change. But if the teams play four overtime periods and are still tied, they will move to one-play possessions: 2-point conversions. Those attempts will start from the 3-yard line unless a penalty is being enforced.

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